7 Jul 2013

How to Build Tension through Sentence Construction: Exercise

You can create tension, or interest, by leaving the most important information to the end of a sentence. To do this, you will need to reverse - or alter - the normal sentence order.
e.g.
A red silk dress was draped across the back of the chair. >
Draped across the back of the chair was a red silk dress.
e.g.
The smell of freshly brewed coffee wafted from the kitchen. >
Wafting from the kitchen was the smell of freshly brewed coffee.

Now you try:
Rewrite these sentences in the same pattern as the sentences above. 


[1] A fat, black cat twined between her red high heels.

[2] Something red, warm and wet was dripping through the ceiling.

[3] Someone - or something - screamed somewhere in the dark, draughty recesses of the house.

[4] The car skidded out of control as it roared, swerved, then crashed into the wall, bursting into flames.

[5] She walked straight up to me and kissed my boyfriend, giving me a sideways glance.

Answers
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[1] Between her red high heels, twined a fat, black cat.

[2] Dripping through the ceiling above was something red, warm and wet.

[3] Somewhere in the dark, draughty recesses of the house, someone - or something - screamed.

[4] Around the last bend, the car roared, swerved then skidded out of control, bursting into flames as it crashed into the wall.

[5] Giving me a sideways glance, she walked straight up to me, got in very close and kissed my boyfriend.

It packs a better punch when you make people wait, right?

Find resources and essays for all GCSE and A-Level set texts, including Shakespeare and poetry
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