18 Apr 2014

Essay Analysis: The Hunchback in the Park, Dylan Thomas GCSE AQA

This poem is tricky! Basically, it's about a hunchback homeless guy who lives in the park. This character is contrasted with a gang of naughty (truant) boys. Thomas shifts between reality and metaphor so it's hard to get a grip on what's real and what's not. Get the A* essay below.

What's real?
The homeless guy is hunchbacked and sleeps in a dog kennel or something that looks like one. The boys are playing truant and they're fascinated with him. They're a bit 'wild', and maybe not so 'innocent'. They torment the hunchback. Both are on the limit of society: half in, half out.

Is it real or not?
1. 'the loud zoo of the willow groves' > this is probably a metaphor. The boys are playing make-believe. 'Zoo' suggests wild animals in captivity. The tension between wild and tame echoes the tension between being in and outside society. The fact it's 'loud' suggests the captives are roaring to get out. It's a fierce mood.

2. 'made the tigers jump out of their eyes' > tiger is a metaphor for the boys' nature. Their wildness is fierce and they let it out. The idea they 'made' tigers contrasts with what the hunchback 'made': a calm, beautiful woman (see below). So maybe, the 'wild' boys' hidden nature is wild; the hunchback's hidden nature is beautiful, straight, tall.

3. 'the groves were blue with sailors': probably a metaphor for the boys imagining sailors. Blue describes blue naval uniforms, but it's also a magical image of transformation. Something that should be green ('groves' = trees) becomes blue. This could be 'blue' as in bad language. Or maybe the boys are swearing like sailors. Thomas never fixes his image clearly. This is what gives it a magical, shimmering effect. Or: what makes it so confusing!

4. 'made all day... a woman': this is probably a metaphor (unless he's carving one from wood?). The hunchback is creating a spirit. There's something god-like about this image. It could show loneliness, need for protection - as where he sits between 'nurses' and 'swans' - or his true nature.

5. 'followed him to his kennel': I really hope this is a metaphor. If the wild boys are chasing him in the dark locked park, even into his kennel, it's not likely to be for a good reason. That's all.

A* Essay Explore the ways in which Dylan Thomas explores issues of individuals and society in ‘Hunchback in the Park.’

In this poem, Thomas deals with the theme of individuals removed from society. The hunchback is ‘solitary’, isolated by his deformity. He lives like a wild man, ironically in a ‘park’: the place where society tames nature, fascinating the boys’ imaginations. The poet juxtaposes the hunchback with the 'wild', 'truant' boys: both sit in a liminal (twilight) space, just on the border of normal society.

The structure seems regular, suggesting regulation and neatness, but the rhyme and line length are not always neat. Where the poem does rhyme, it links ‘park’ and ‘dark’. This is a sinister pairing: of a neat pleasure ground (park) with the breeding ground of all fears (dark).


Only the hunchback sees the park in the dark, emphasising his isolation from society, but also from reality. The park is ‘unmade’ at night. It’s as if reality unravels. We see this in the unbroken force of Thomas' long sentence in the final stanza. He writes: ‘the railings and shrubberies / the birds the grass the trees the lake’. It's as if the park is spilling out, without boundaries, like the boys' make-believe. They make ‘tigers’ jump out of their eyes, imagine sailors turning the green groves ‘blue’: with bad language or uniforms, as if the sailors are melting into the trees. They also follow him to his ‘kennel’. They’re in society but they’re also drawn out of it. They sit outside a little already as they’re ‘truant’ from school. At the end, Thomas describes them as ‘wild’. Just like the hunchback, they are not ‘chained’


The idea of ‘bell time’, closing time could link to school bells, as if the hunchback is waiting to be freed from the neat daytime park. The second to last stanza is unreal, magical: he ‘made’ a woman. This image of creation - the ‘made’ woman - could contrast with the ‘unmade’ park. It can’t be literal, unless he’s god, but in some ways, Thomas is clothing him with god-like powers of creation. In other places, though, the hunchback is barely human in his ‘dog kennel’. By being outside of society, he gains something magical. Where the boys ‘made tigers’, he makes a perfect, woman ‘without fault’. We could interpret this to mean physically perfect, or without sin. This could link to the boys being 'innocent'. But are they innocent? They put ‘gravel’ in his cup. Thomas may be saying they’re fascinated by the strangeness of the hunchback, but imagery blue’ sailors and ‘tigers’ seems (morally) dark: as if this is a dark fascination. Though both stand apart from society, there’s some sense in this poem they boys torment him because he stands apart.
The author, , is an Oxford graduate, outstanding-rated English Language and Literature teacher and of ages 10-18 in the British education system. In 2012, she was nominated for Pearson's Teaching Awards. As a private tutor, she raises grades often from C to A. Her writing is also featured in The Huffington Post. She offers private tuition in the Haywards Heath area, West Sussex.                                                                                  
  

3 Apr 2014

Mattti

For Maths
You may like Khan Academy. Have a go.

To Revise Science:
You need a checklist of topics which may appear on the exam. You can get this from your teacher. It may be in your exercise book. Or you can get it from the syllabus. You may find it in a revision guide or CGP book for your exam board.

Then you need to do practice papers and mark them yourself using the mark scheme.
1. grade each question on how confident you are to answer it.
2. start by only answering the questions you're most confident about. Highlight key words in the question.
3. then immediately check your answers to these questions using the mark scheme. Take note if you are scoring well, or badly. If badly, you need to deal with your exam technique.
4. Look again at the words you highlighted, the notes in the mark scheme and how far it is different to what you wrote. Think about why.
5. Print off another paper. Repeat steps 1-3. Hopefully this time, your answers should be better.
6. Now tackle some questions you are less confident about. You can, if you want, read up on the topic area before answering the question.
7. Mark your own answers. Look up anything you don't understand either in the textbook or google. It can help to work with someone else: you can help each other with the bits you don't understand. You can use gcse bitesize or My GCSE Science. If you get anything wrong, copy out the correct answer onto your paper from the mark scheme.
8. For questions you literally know nothing about, use the mark scheme, your textbook and the resources above to learn the answer.

As you go through each question, check them off on your revision topic list.

Science:
Biology AQA Part 1
[1] Question Paper + Mark Scheme June 2013 (Higher)
[2] Question Paper + Mark Scheme November 2013 (Higher)
[3] Question Paper + Mark Scheme November 2013 (Higher)

Chemistry AQA
[1] Question Paper + Mark Scheme June 2013 (Higher)
[2] Question Paper + Mark Scheme November 2013 (Higher)
[3] Question Paper Mark Scheme November 2013 (Higher)

Physics AQA
[1] Question Paper + Mark Scheme June 2013 (Higher)
[2] Question Paper + Mark Scheme November 2013 (Higher)
[3] Question Paper Mark Scheme November 2013 (Higher)
The author, , is an Oxford graduate, outstanding-rated English Language and Literature teacher and of ages 10-18 in the British education system. In 2012, she was nominated for Pearson's Teaching Awards. As a private tutor, she raises grades often from C to A. Her writing is also featured in The Huffington Post. She offers private tuition in the Haywards Heath area, West Sussex.                                                                                  
  

17 Mar 2014

De-stress for Your Exams: Calm Sounds

My daughter gets really stressed sometimes. So I made her this, to help her relax and stay calm. 'Counting Sheep' runs up to a hundred. If you think stressful thoughts, re-start the track. See how long it takes you to get up to 100. It's excellent for wiping your mind clean, running up through the sequence.

I recorded the birds in my garden. This is one to play on a loop. If you don't like birds, you can listen to the extract from Walt Whitman's fabulous Song of Myself, which I fell in love with recently.

The classical tracks are just beautiful. Play them on a loop at low volume and feel yourself unwind.





The author, , is an Oxford graduate, outstanding-rated English Language and Literature teacher and of ages 10-18 in the British education system. In 2012, she was nominated for Pearson's Teaching Awards. As a private tutor, she raises grades often from C to A. Her writing is also featured in The Huffington Post. She offers private tuition in the Haywards Heath area, West Sussex.                                                                                  
  

What view of love does Shakespeare present in these extracts?

Analyse the language and consider the type of the Petrarchan lover. Find an article about this here

This extract is from Act 1, Scene 1. It is the first time that we meet Romeo.
BENVOLIO 
Alas, that love, so gentle in his view,
Should be so tyrannous and rough in proof!
ROMEO
Alas, that love, whose view is muffled still,
Should, without eyes, see pathways to his will!
Where shall we dine? O me! What fray was here?
Yet tell me not, for I have heard it all.
Here's much to do with hate, but more with love.
Why, then, O brawling love! O loving hate!
O any thing, of nothing first create!
O heavy lightness! serious vanity!
Mis-shapen chaos of well-seeming forms!
Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire,
sick health!
Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!
This love feel I, that feel no love in this.
Dost thou not laugh?
BENVOLIO
No, coz, I rather weep.
ROMEO
Good heart, at what?
BENVOLIO
At thy good heart's oppression.
ROMEO
Why, such is love's transgression.
Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast,
Which thou wilt propagate, to have it prest
With more of thine: this love that thou hast shown
Doth add more grief to too much of mine own.
Love is a smoke raised with the fume of sighs;
Being purged, a fire sparkling in lovers' eyes;
Being vex'd a sea nourish'd with lovers' tears:
What is it else? a madness most discreet,
A choking gall and a preserving sweet.
Farewell, my coz.
BENVOLIO
Soft! I will go along;
An if you leave me so, you do me wrong.
ROMEO

Tut, I have lost myself; I am not here;
This is not Romeo, he's some other where.

The author, , is an Oxford graduate, outstanding-rated English Language and Literature teacher and of ages 10-18 in the British education system. In 2012, she was nominated for Pearson's Teaching Awards. As a private tutor, she raises grades often from C to A. Her writing is also featured in The Huffington Post. She offers private tuition in the Haywards Heath area, West Sussex.                                                                                  
  

11 Mar 2014

Essay Analysis: On Seeing the 100% Perfect Girl One Beautiful April Morning

How does Haruki Murakami present the themes in The 100% Perfect Girl?
This story is from the AQA GCSE English Literature short story anthology Sunlight on the Grass.

This story is about the strangeness of the idea of true love. What are the odds we will ever meet ‘the one’ if there is only one. How would we know if we did meet them? In the second part of the story, the words ‘believe’ and ’miracle’ are repeated many times in quick succession. Love is, ‘a miracle, a cosmic miracle’. The repetition emphasises the sheer scale of perfect love, ‘cosmic’ suggesting both the divine and scientific bases of love. Yet it's also a very 'ordinary', even 'boring' day to day event. Ordinariness is juxtaposed with fairytale and cosmic miracle, to show how we construct love in imagination, and in reality.


In the first section, Murakami asks whether if we met the 100% person, how could we have the guts to make something of it, let alone speak to them, and if we did, what if we weren’t ‘the one’ for them? He lingers in the one moment of passing her on the street as if time stops and fate is hanging in the balance. He imagines her dialogue in crisp detail: ‘Sorry, she could say, I might be the 100% perfect girl for you, but you’re not the 100% perfect boy for me.’ The balanced construction sets his feeling she is ‘100% perfect’ against its antithesis - ‘you’re not the 100%… for me’. This shows how unlikely love is, that it is so easily cancelled out, even though he has achieved the unlikely figure of 100% perfection. The narrator’s fears are exaggerated by how perfect he thinks she is. ’100%’ is too much, as is the following metaphor: ‘This was something sure to be crammed full of warm secrets, like an antique clock built when peace filled the world’. This is an impossible image, and may suggest the dangers of needing perfection: you’re sure to be disappointed, or paralysed in the face of it. His vision is attractive though, and in a way, we want to believe with him, that this is possible.

The story is dominated by a wistful longing, which we see in the words ‘perfect’ and ‘beautiful’ in the title and also the word ‘dream’. He describes himself in third person in the second section as an 'ordinary lonely boy', as if he can only see himself clearly with distance, longing to be completed by the 'ordinary lonely girl' who makes up the other half of the sentence. He says they were 'like all the others' as if the entire human condition is of loneliness longing for love. Interestingly, most of the actual ‘events’ happen in the fairytale, making a sharp point about the extent to which dreams can ruin reality, how ideas are fine, but at some point, they need to be translated into action. One reason this story can feel frustrating is that nothing actually happens. Like the ‘someone’ who the narrator tells his story to, we feel annoyed at the narrator. Doesn’t he see for it to be a story, for love to exist, someone has to do something?  It’s ironic that it’s only in the fairytale section that anything ‘actually happened’. In the first section, the narrator’s fears surface that she ‘wouldn’t believe’ and ‘might not want to talk to me’, with heavy use of the subjunctive (could/would/should) to show that he’s lost in fearful possibilities. He details his imaginary nervous breakdown - ‘I’d probably go to pieces. I’d never recover from the shock’ - with almost as much vivid care as he details the girl. Murakami may be showing the dangers of love in general, but also in this specific case, the man seems to live overly in his imagination.



This isn’t a story of ‘meeting’, it is only a story of ‘seeing’. The narrator insists it is important, though nothing happens and he can give no suitable reasons why she is ‘perfect’. When asked if she’s good-looking, he ‘can’t remember’, ‘can’t recall’ and is ‘no great beauty’. The depth of his analysis is ‘it’s weird’ or ‘strange’. Even before he’s finished telling his story to ‘someone’, they are ‘already bored’. His listener needs reasons, or action, listing verbs the man might have done: ‘do’, ‘talk’, or ‘follow’. The man says casually ‘nah’. Even he makes it seem unimportant when he says ‘just passed her.’ This echoes the first sentence. ‘I walk past the 100% perfect girl’. The first sentence contains the only event in the entire story. Even in the present tense (walk), it’s already ‘past’. The notion that a man and woman in their thirties can be ‘boy’ and ‘girl’ adds to the detached, child-like feel. Perhaps he isn’t ready, emotionally to engage with the adult world: he’s trapped in a helpless immature state, telling fairy stories rather than actually doing something about it.

The woman does feel real though. He details her cleanly, and critically: as ‘not that good looking’, ‘doesn’t stand out’ and ‘her hair is still bent out of shape’. This immediately establishes that the woman isn’t objectively ‘100% perfect’, but she is ‘100%’ for him: which means she is 100% perfect, because from his point of view, that’s all that matters. The narrator’s language is chatty and he appeals directly to the reader where he says ‘tell you the truth’, as if he’s inviting us to share in the question of love. The whole story deals with the philosophical questions around finding true love. Murakami also deals with the question of whether love is rational. Though the ‘girl’ isn’t ‘even close to a ‘girl’’, his reaction is physical and instant: ‘The moment I see her, there’s a rumbling in my chest.’ It’s a gut reaction. That’s all we need to know. He says - sheepishly - that he has no evidence, and asks us simply to believe that she is perfect. Through this, Murakami invites us to share in the experience of love: it’s blind faith, without logic, happens instantly and doubt always lingers. Also, one person cannot write it alone, hence the ‘someone’s frustration: someone has to act. Love is a relationship, and cannot be generated in one person’s imagination alone. It has to get out into the real world, and stand real tests, not the dysfunctional fairytale test devised in the second section.

I think if I have to write any more about this story I may go mad. You get the general idea though…! There are roughly 1,100 words in this essay and it would be graded top A*.
The author, , is an Oxford graduate, outstanding-rated English Language and Literature teacher and of ages 10-18 in the British education system. In 2012, she was nominated for Pearson's Teaching Awards. As a private tutor, she raises grades often from C to A. Her writing is also featured in The Huffington Post. She offers private tuition in the Haywards Heath area, West Sussex.                                                                                  
  

10 Mar 2014

Analysis of The Destructors by Graham Greene


Essay on The Destructors from Stories of Ourselves for the Cambridge IGCSE Anthology. Find the story here.
Explore how Graham Greene presents the shifting power within the group as leadership passes from Blackie to T.

From the first sentence, Greene establishes the power shift: as the ‘latest recruit’ becomes ‘leader’ the alliteration emphasises the antithesis, and the shock that the newest member suddenly gains power. This creates tension, begging the question, how, and why? The story deals with the twin themes of power, and destruction against a background of Blitzed London. The gang meets on the bomb site of the ‘last bomb’ of the ‘first blitz’, the words ‘first’ and ‘last’ suggesting a deeper symbolism to this meeting place, and the work of the gang. Greene gives echoes of Hitler’s leadership which wrought so much destruction over Europe, the childish destructors finishing off the larger task begun by adults which is symbolised by Mr Thomas’ house. It is on a ‘shattered’ street and stands out alone, ‘jagged’, ‘crippled’. Though it has ‘suffered’ damage, it somehow survived, one of the landmarks of the gang’s world.

In the first part of the story, the gang is shown to be democratic, ‘drawing lots’, and make plans on ‘suggestion’. In the first part of the story, Blackie dominates the speech and actions of the gang. He claims to have heard the bomb fall, and no-one dares contradict him. Greene refers to him a ‘the leader’ and he is the one who here, ‘proposed’ all their plans, the last word giving some suggestion of parliamentary democracy. In some ways, T. seems like the house. He stand alone in ‘brooding silence’, spare, from a father who has ‘come down in the world’ and a mother who ‘considers herself better’. He seems a candidate for bullying, as where Greene says he ‘should have been an object of mockery’. Yet his very ‘odd quality’ and ‘unpredictable’ nature are the things that later ‘established’ him. As he takes root, evil creeps in. The shift is subtle. But the possibility of bullying gradually subsides, and T. no longer ‘looked at the ground, as though he had thoughts to hide.’ Through this, Greene explores the transfer of power. Blackie reacts as if T is ‘treading on dangerous ground,’ but it’s ambiguous what the danger is. It’s almost as if Blackie feels sorry for him, as if T. will make himself weak. The danger seems to be in the gang, who form ‘an impromptu court’ as if to ‘try some case of deviation’, showing the power of the masses in Blackie’s eyes. Yet the real danger is in T’s nature. When they take him as leader, it’s on a ‘vote’. Are we more disturbed by T. or by the fact he, like Hitler, is democratically elected?




The mood is tense from the start, of ‘teeth tightly clamped’, emphasising the shock shift in the dynamics of power, when a more compelling story overwrites an old narrative. Here, the more compelling story is destruction of something ‘beautiful’, for ‘fame’, and for pleasure, carried out in a disturbingly organised way by someone who is clearly aware that what he is destroying is ‘beautiful’. Greene makes the point T speaks little, but one of the longest speeches is where he says “Wren built it… The man who built St. Paul’s’. Hitler famously tried to destroy St Paul’s, and the boy lingers over descriptions over the architectural wonders of Mr Thomas’ house: ‘a staircase two hundred years old like a corkscrew. Nothing holds it up.’ Both boys marvel at the magic of it and T. continues to detail the panelling with almost as much loving care as when he demolishes it, piece by piece. It’s bleakly ironic that his appreciation of this beauty happens at the same time that he forms his plan, with eyes ‘as grey and disturbed as the drab August day’, to “destroy it.” He is a symbol of evil, reframing them as ‘worms in an apple’, symbol of corruption, decay, a terrible juxtaposition with their youth which ought to symbolise innocence. Or perhaps it is the snake in the garden of Eden.

This is a new type of monster from Blackie’s old regime, with empty bluster: breaking in, but not wanting to get caught, with games of ‘snatched’ bus rides. The kids’ efforts are like games, trials referred to as ’exploits’. When T has them destroy the house, it is terrifyingly methodical, more like ‘work’. T. stands apart as he won’t steal the money: he ‘burns’ it - a man’s entire life’s savings. He claims a disturbing moral superiority, perhaps like Hitler destroying the art treasures of Europe as he retreated. The child, like the man, is a psychopath. He has an inner vision obscure to the others, which compels them almost because it is obscure. While the boy is disturbing, what’s more disturbing is the ease with which he gains power, and how easily the others march to his tune.
The author, , is an Oxford graduate, outstanding-rated English Language and Literature teacher and of ages 10-18 in the British education system. In 2012, she was nominated for Pearson's Teaching Awards. As a private tutor, she raises grades often from C to A. Her writing is also featured in The Huffington Post. She offers private tuition in the Haywards Heath area, West Sussex.                                                                                  
  

19 Feb 2014

Foundation Practice Paper GCSE English OCR, WJEC

Get practice papers for English Language Exams in June 2014. 

Whether you're doing English or English Language GCSE, it's the same exam paper.

The exam boards' websites are usually a nightmare to navigate so here are some quick links. These are for Foundation, which is up to grade C:

OCR
January 2013 Question Paper + Reading Booklet + Mark Scheme
June 2012 Question Paper + Reading Booklet + Mark Scheme
January 2012 Question Paper + Reading Booklet + Mark Scheme
WJECNovember 2012 part one Reading + part two Writing



This advice is to help you with the WJEC English GCSE foundation level paper:



Question one is about facts. BEWARE: don’t copy huge chunks word for word. You can use blocks of 1-2 words though. In fact, you’ll probably need to. Don’t take any more than this, though.
Clue: to find facts, look for numbers or words like ‘several’, ‘many people’ etc.
Words like: can, could, should, ought, might, would, etc, are used for possibilities so are not necessarily true (facts).

17 Feb 2014

Ideas for Stories: How to Get Started

Choose a location you’d find interesting like a tropical jungle, a city, ancient ruins or a mountain. Create two characters who would have a good reason to go there and make them hate each other for some reason. Think what they’re looking for, or being chased by; then flip it part way through so that they run out of water, fall down a cliff, get chased by wolves etc.

Then do a google image search for ‘mountains’, ‘tropical jungle’ etc so you’ve got pictures to help with your descriptions. Think would it be hot, cold, jagged, etc? What objects would they have with them? Create an increasingly sinister mood and go into detail as they explore the landscape. 

Conjure up a situation that you find interesting - hunting wolves, looking for treasure, etc - then slowly build up tension as we start to realise that things are going wrong.

You will need
describing words, including interesting verb-choices

Most importantly, you should constantly try to create a strong mood.

If this is a 1,000 word story, you need to spend time on description and not try to fill the space with millions of events, briefly described.


Helpful?
You might like to grab 25 Awesome Story Ideas with pictures and ideas for how to start.

The author, , is an Oxford graduate, outstanding-rated English Language and Literature teacher and of ages 10-18 in the British education system. In 2012, she was nominated for Pearson's Teaching Awards. As a private tutor, she raises grades often from C to A. Her writing is also featured in The Huffington Post. She offers private tuition in the Haywards Heath area, West Sussex.                                                                                  
  

16 Feb 2014

Complex Vocabulary for 11+ KS3 Words to Learn

rigid adj stiff
indecision noun inability to decide
ingratitude noun not-grateful(ness)
portray verb to show, depict
residue noun stuff left over, what remains
anew adv afresh
solemn adj serious
reluctant adj not keen (to do something)
wanly adv palely (i.e. not keen)
compelled verb forced (to do something)
exasperated adj totally annoyed, frustrated
preposterous adj totally ridiculous
languidly adv lazily, very slowly, unenergetically
menacing adj frightening
endurance noun strength to endure (put up with) something
convulsed verb violently moved/affected
ameliorate verb make something bad a bit better
ominous adj makes us think something bad is going to happen
relent verb give up (on a decision/idea)
wry adj a knowing look, dry humour
leery adj suspicious (with good reason)
marionette noun puppet with strings
mused verb thought about 
manipulate verb control events or people sneakily






nimble adj light and quick at moving
askew adj. not in place, tilted or slanted
threshold noun, place: between two places, e.g. a doorway
violations noun: a wrong, stealing someone's rights
ruefully adv. regretfully
dubious adj. uncertain or not quite right, e.g. the bridge looked a bit dubious
onslaught noun: an attack, links to the word slaughter
levitate verb a magical type of lifting
intolerable adj. something you can't bear
sarcastically adv. where you say something without meaning it, as if to make fun of an idea: e.g. 'eating slugs* is a great idea' he said sarcastically. *slugs carry diseases that can kill you (if you eat them)
placating vb to placate (to say or do something to calm someone down, not necessarily because you mean it). e.g. 'Aunt Beryl, you look lovely in that dress, now please stop sobbing,' he said, placatingly.



decrepit - adj, massively broken, decayed, ruined, or falling to bits
abominably - adv. terribly badly
stifle - verb. squash it, silence it
chivvying - verb. to hurry/ encourage someone
invalid - adj. either disabled or incapable OR doesn't count
institution - adj. important, official organisation
gusto - noun, enthusiasm
petulant - adj. sulky
ominously - adv. worringly
equestrian - adj. (horsey) to do with horses
impertinence - noun. rudeness
skittishly - adv. won't stay still
loftily - adv. mightily
vexed - adj. annoyed
impromptu - adj. spontaneous
gaunt -adj. thin and hollow
jubilant - adj. the biggest happiness and joy and feeling of awesomeness (I won!)
gastroenteritis - a bad stomach bug

*
observation (something you've noticed) noun (you can't hold it, like a potato, but you can give it to someone)
reprovingly (in a telling-off kind of way) adverb
resentful (bitter, won't let go of little things) adjective
affair (important happening) noun
desolate (really, really, really, really sad) adjective
evidently (obviously, as shown by the evidence) adverb
astute (very clever, sharp, wise) adjective
empathy (like kindness, thoughtfulness) adjective
guffaws (laughs in a jolly way, like Santa Claus) verb, or noun
decidedly (definitely) adverb
awe noun (massive respect, like you would have for God)
adjective is: awesome, awful, awe-inspiring
adverb: awfully 
The author, , is an Oxford graduate, outstanding-rated English Language and Literature teacher and of ages 10-18 in the British education system. In 2012, she was nominated for Pearson's Teaching Awards. As a private tutor, she raises grades often from C to A. Her writing is also featured in The Huffington Post. She offers private tuition in the Haywards Heath area, West Sussex.